literal

Links in Hypernotation

In one of the previous posts I discussed the idea of two types of links on the Web: tree links and graph links. The Web can be seen as a collection of trees with hyperlinks connecting random nodes of these trees. These hyperlinks are what cause the trees to become graphs, thus the name “graph” [...]


Getting rid of typed literals

So far I was dealing with the complexities of the RDF model – the mess surrounding the concept of a node, many different types of nodes, as well as different methods of identification of nodes that have a name. However, there are aspects which are not just overcomplicated, but plain ugly as well. Here I [...]


The “RDF graph” URI pattern

Anyone involved in anything having to do with the Semantic Web or Linked Data knows how much time and energy is wasted on endless discussions on the blank node issue. It is a controversial topic because on the one side blank nodes cause huge problems in practice, while on the other, they enable a great [...]


Literals, blank nodes, n-ary relations and rdf:value

A literal node is a specific type of a node because it represents a value and as such is always dependent on a resource whose value represents. As has been discussed in the post Problems of the RDF model: Literals, there is a need to clearly separate the concept of a literal from this resource [...]


Problems of the RDF model: Literals

Literals are nodes in an RDF graph, used to identify values such as numbers and dates by means of a lexical representation. Literals may be plain or typed: A plain literal is a string combined with an optional language tag. It is considered to denote itself, so has a fixed meaning. A typed literal is [...]